Spotted Lanternfly Recently Detected in New England States

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is an exotic invasive planthopper that has known infestations in Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia. The preferred host for spotted lanternfly is tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), but it has the potential to devastate industries such as viticulture, fruit tree, plant nursery and timber as well as become a major nuisance for residents in infested areas. Find out more at the links below.

Recently, there have been detections of SLF in New England. A detection does not mean that an established population has been found.

image of spotted lanternfly adult insect
Adult spotted lanternfly (Photo: Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org)

Maine

September 29, 2020 - The Maine Department of Agricultural, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) announced finding egg masses of the invasive spotted lanternfly (SLF) on trees in Maine communities and is urging residents to report any sign of the invasive pest. The egg masses were found on trees from Pennsylvania (where SLF is established) and planted in Boothbay, Freeport, Northeast Harbor, and Yarmouth.

DACF urges anyone who received goods or materials, such as plants, landscaping materials, or outdoor furniture, from a state with a known SLF infestation to carefully check the materials, including any packaging, for signs of SLF. There are currently known populations of SLF in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

If any life stages of SLF are found, residents should take a photo or collect the specimen and report any pest potential sightings to [email protected]. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings, or inch-long, rectangular yellowish-brown egg masses covered with a gray waxy coating. Egg masses may be found on any flat surface. Read the whole press release here.

image of spotted lanternfly eggs on a tree in Maine
Spotted lanternfly egg mass. (Photo: Sarah Scally, Assistant Horticulturist, Maine DACF) 

Massachusetts

September 25, 2020 - The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) today announced that it has identified two dead specimens of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in Massachusetts communities, and is urging residents to report any sign of the invasive pest. The specimens were recovered in the towns of Milford and Norwood, and were brought into Massachusetts on materials shipped from Pennsylvania counties currently under a spotted lanternfly quarantine.

Additionally, MDAR was recently notified that nursery stock with spotted lanternfly egg masses and adults may have been unintentionally imported and planted in several parts of Massachusetts.

MDAR is urging anyone who has received goods or materials, such as plants, landscaping materials, or outdoor furniture, from a state with a known SLF infestation to carefully check the materials, including any packaging, for signs of spotted lanternfly. Currently, there are known introductions of SLF in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

If any indication of SLF is found, residents should take a photo or collect the specimen, and report any potential sightings of the pest using MDAR’s online reporting form. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings, or inch-long, rectangular yellowish-brown egg masses covered with a gray waxy coating. Egg masses may be found on any flat surface. Read the full press release here.

New Hampshire

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — An invasive pest considered to be a threat to a variety agricultural, ornamental, and hardwood crops was found at a New Hampshire nursery and in two towns in eastern Massachusetts this month. Read the story from the Associated Press.

Connecticut

September 21, 2020 - The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) in cooperation with USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) announce the detection of single live adult spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, in West Haven, CT and multiple live adults in Greenwich, CT.

While the spotted lanternfly in West Haven may be a single import due to travel from out of state, there is a population in Greenwich and surveys in the immediate areas of both detections will be conducted. Single adults were detected in Farmington in 2018 and Southbury in 2019. Read the full press release here.

Find out More

Find out more about spotted lanternfly:

USDA-APHIS

Penn State Extension

Map of Confirmed Spotted Lanternfly Locations

Think you’ve seen spotted lanternfly or evidence of spotted lanternfly in your state?

Report it:

Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont